Leave a comment

The Importance of Editing

My first thought when reading this article:

Editing sounds really, really hard.

I always thought when I was little that if I didn’t get to be a famous movie star, maybe I could be the person filming so that I could still meet famous people. I change my mind. There is much more involved in getting a good shot than I thought.

Each scene, whether it is 3 seconds or 2 minutes, is carefully thought out, drawn, and planned. I would never guess how much work goes into the shot before the camera is even turned on. The direction of the shot, the continuity between scenes, and the seamless editing all come together to make a scene that seems natural to the viewer. It’s kind of unfair, really, that the editors work so hard with a goal of their work not being noticed (nobody wants to be aware that they are watching an edited scene).

This article seemed to put jump cuts in a negative connotation. Not that I know too much about filming, but I’ve always liked montage scenes. Here is one of my favorite, the shopping scene from Pretty Woman (towards the end it’s no longer a montage but it’s still a funny scene so you should watch it to the end).

But there is also an issue pointed out in this article whose technical name I had never heard- technical continuity. Whenever those nit-picky viewers pine over a film to find a small little prop mistake, they are really looking for technical continuity, when the physical objects don’t line up between cuts. Going with my own continuity, here is an example of a mistake in technical continuity in Pretty Woman. Pay attention to the newspaper.

Knowing how, when, where, and which way to cut are all things that, at least to me, are impossible for one person to keep track of. I guess that’s why film production involves so many people. But still, an editor has a lot of stuff to worry about.

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: